Floppy Samoyed Puppies

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KNOWING MORE ABOUT SAMOYEDS

The Samoyed is a friendly, personable dog. These are intelligent dogs, with a touch of independence. Bred to live in a tent in very close quarters with their families, they thrive on human company. Samoyeds will alarm bark and, if left alone for long periods of time, will often develop into nuisance barkers. Digging can be a problem because they dig to reach a cool resting place.

Samoyeds tend to get along well with other dogs as well as people and with other pets they are raised with. They are herding dogs and may show some tendency to chase or nip. In general, they get along well with children, although they can be a little boisterous for small toddlers. Samoyeds are another of the truly easy-to-keep breeds, thriving on fairly small amounts of top quality food. Too many treats or not enough exercise can easily lead to obesity. 

These are active dogs and need daily exercise. Since Samoyeds are so attuned to people, they enjoy training and will happily compete in obedience, agility, herding, sledding, and weight pulls. They do not do well if left alone for long periods of time. Samoyeds usually alarm bark but then greet the stranger with a wagging tail and tongue. The characteristic “Sammie smile” with the curved lips is not in any way an expression of aggression.

Your newly purchased samoyed

The active Samoyed is not suited to apartment or condo life. A home with a large, securely fenced yard is the best choice. Because the Samoyed is a working dog, he needs room to romp and play. Keep him mentally challenged with ongoing training and dog sports. Allow him to become bored and he’s likely to dig, escape, or chew to entertain himself. Note: The Samoyed should be kept on leash whenever he’s in public; he seldom can resist the lure of small, scurrying animals. With his Nordic heritage, the Samoyed is a natural fit for cold climates, and he loves to play in the snow. Conversely, with his thick coat, he can be sensitive to heat. Do not allow him to exercise strenuously when it is extremely hot — limit high-level activity to early morning or evening when it’s cooler. During the heat of the day, keep your Sammy inside with fans or air conditioning. You’ll need to take special care if you’re raising a Samoyed puppy. Like many large breed dogs, the Samoyed grows rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders and injury. They do well on a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast. Another important step in training a Samoyed puppy is socialization (the process by which puppies or adults dogs learn how to be friendly and get along with other dogs and people). Like any dog, he can become timid if he is not properly socialized and exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when he’s young. Formal puppy and obedience classes are also recommended to teach the Samoyed proper canine manners.

Your Samoyed's nutrition

Recommended daily amount: 1.5 to 2.5 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals. Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl. Samoyed puppies need slow, steady growth. Feed a good-quality diet with 22 to 24 percent protein, and 12 to 15 percent fat. Keep your Samoyed in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you’re unsure whether he’s overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test. First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can’t, he needs less food and more exercise.

These are intelligent dogs, with a touch of independence. Bred to live in a tent in very close quarters with their families. they thrive on human company. Samoyeds will alarm bark and, if left alone for long periods of time, will often develop into nuisance barkers. Get your samoyed puppie now.

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